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Posted on: May 02, 2016

The usual starting point is a visit to your doctor for a physical exam. This appointment will probably include:

  • A review of your family’s health history
  • A discussion of your own personal medical history
  • A physical exam, during which your doctor will listen to your breathing.
  • Laboratory tests that measure lung function.
  • Tests for allergies.
  • Once you and your doctor know what kind of asthma you have, and what your asthma triggers are, you can work together to develop a treatment plan that meets your needs. This plan may include medication, lifestyle changes, and avoidance of triggers.

There are two kinds of medicines that are prescribed to treat asthma:

Maintenance medications such as anti-inflammatory drugs help to prevent and reduce inflammation and swelling of the airways. They are an important part of long-term management of asthma symptoms. Long-acting bronchodilators are also available for the long-term control of daytime symptoms, nocturnal asthma, and exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB). Quick-relief, or “rescue” medications such as short-acting bronchodilators help provide rapid relief to relax muscles around the airways.